Total Solar Eclipse of 1941 Sep 21

Google Maps and Solar Eclipse Paths

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This interactive Google map shows the path of the Total Solar Eclipse of 1941 Sep 21 . The northern and southern path limits are blue and the central line is red. The yellow lines crossing the path indicate the position of maximum eclipse at 10-minute intervals. The four-way toggle arrows (upper left corner) are for navigating around the map. The zoom bar (left edge) is used to change the magnification. The two map buttons (top right) let you switch between map view and a satellite view.

Map centered on (latitude, longitude):
Cursor position (latitude, longitude):
Distance from last marker:
Show marker on click
Large map

The green marker labeled GE is the point of Greatest Eclipse. Click anywhere on the map to mark a position and calculate the eclipse times there. Move the cursor over a marker to reveal the eclipse circumstances for that position. The marker predictions can also be viewed in a new window via the Eclipse Times Popup button. You can select and copy this infomation to paste into a word processor.

An individual marker can be removed by using the Clear Marker button in the marker's Eclipse Times Popup window. All markers can be removed using the Clear Markers button below the eclipse map. Choose the Large Map check box to produce a bigger map (hint: enlarge you browser window to maximum size before selecting the Large Map check box). This option is especially useful to users with large monitors and fast internet connections.

Below the lower left corner of the map are three readouts. The first gives the geographic coordinates (latitude & longitude) of the map center while the second gives the geographic coordinates of the cursor. The third line gives the distance of the cursor from the last marker. For more information, see Google Eclipse Map Instructions.

Total Solar Eclipse of 1941 Sep 21

Solar Eclipse Links


Please visit the Acknowledgments Page for complete details and links.

Predictions for the Total Solar Eclipse of 1941 Sep 21 were generated using the VSOP87/ELP2000-85 solar and lunar ephemerides and a value of ΔT = 25.2 seconds. The accuracy of the northern and southern edges of the eclipse path are limited to approximately 1-2 kilometers due to the lunar limb profile.

Eclipse calculations are by Fred Espenak, and he assumes full responsibility for their accuracy. Permission is freely granted to reproduce this data when accompanied by an acknowledgment:

"Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA's GSFC"

For more information, see: NASA Copyright Information

2013 Dec 19